Put the "ing" in your Boating

Call: 519-538-2887

Call: 1-519-538-2887

brochure fan4Knowing the actual “real” length of the boat you are about to buy, whether you are buying used/pre-owned or new, will arm you with excellent valuable information in the boat buying process. Comparing the actual length allows you compare apples to apples.

Boats tend to grow, when they are being sold or bragged about; and conversely, they shrink when they are being stored or docked.

Don’t get ripped! Compare actual hull lengths (without pulpits, platforms and creative marketing). Beware of model numbers, as they most often imply that the boat is longer than it actually is.

How do you know what size your boat really is?

 

brochure libraryGetting specifications for a used/pre-owned boat will help you make a more informed buying decision.

This is only one of the many reasons boaters visit the old boat brochure library at www.OldBoatBrochures.com..

Not only can you compare boats more accurately, knowing the length overall (LOA) including the bow pulpits and swim platforms, is most important information to know to help you determine, whether your boat will fit in your boat house when you get it home, and that you can shut the door.

If you need to trailer your boat, knowing the actual weight with and without the motor, will help you match your boat to the correct sized trailer and tow vehicle.

 

Find out how big your boat really is from the specs in the original boat brochure.

There are so many more reasons to checkout www.OldBoatBrochures.com – A library of close to 10,000 old boat brochures, (a library and webiste that is for sale). 

For more information

  • email Doug - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
  • call Doug at (519) 538-2887.

For money-saving, boat buying tips, see also “Buy a Boat With Confidence” e-book - ~400 pages of invaluable information.

 

Comments (1)

  1. Ken Smith

Hello Doug.

Your article “How big is your boat actually” is definitely a document individuals new to boating need to understand. For that matter, not only new boaters. I am using Sea Ray as an example since that is where my experience is...

Hello Doug.

Your article “How big is your boat actually” is definitely a document individuals new to boating need to understand. For that matter, not only new boaters. I am using Sea Ray as an example since that is where my experience is founded. Please understand this is not a finger pointing exercise at any boat manufacturer, just something that becomes a lesson learned.

For example, a 1989 300 Searay Sundancer actually has more interior space than a 1992 330 Sundancer. The 89 model had a non-integrated swim platform. As time moved on, the platform was included in the LOA measurements. The vessel may well have been marketed as at 330/350, but in actuality, was no larger and in fact in some interior areas such as the v-berth was smaller.

In fact, if my memory serves me correctly, a new 370 has dimension competition from the much older models.

It pays to do the due diligence when it comes to the cockpit and cabin actual space that is provided. Those areas of course come into play and importance if extended stays on the boat are the norm.

Forget the exterior model identification, and take the time to ensure fit and function for your style of boating.

Our experience with our recently sold 1992 Searay 330 Sundancer, were comments such as this, “ I cannot believe how much room you have “, from owners of newer and larger (according to the model id) vessels.

Any way, that is just my “ two cents worth”.

Ken Smith
ON Canada

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